More Java Vulnerabilities

Oracle recently announced an update which patches twenty separate vulnerabilities all of which individually can provide remote access to an affected system without authentication. I’ll re-iterate that just in case you figured it was a mistake on my part: each of the individual twenty CVEs mentioned in their patch summary pose a direct remotely exploitable risk to a machine running their Java VM.

Those of you who have been reading my blog for a while will know how I feel about Java – more specifically the official implementation, and I realize that I am, to an extent, preaching to the converted. I realize that those who are still running the Oracle JVM are doing so for a very good reason and that there are custom application suites which have been developed specifically for certain niche industries where it is simply infeasible to even consider migrating to any sort of alternative solution.

That said there are literally millions of home and small business machines with the Oracle JVM on-board for no good reason other than that the OEM decided it was a good idea (along with all of the other bloat that vendors typically include for reasons no intelligent engineer can understand). The world wide web has pretty much abandoned the Java experiment, and it is safe to say that most users in the aforementioned group are needlessly increasing the risk profile and exposure of their PC.

I’d like those of you who are stuck with the Oracle JVM to just take a few minutes to consider whether there is anything your organization can do (over and beyond the obvious – staying up to date on patches) to reduce the risk to your enterprise. Can an alternate Java virtual machine be substituted? Can you apply the principle of least privilege to at least minimize the amount of damage a compromised Java VM could actually do to your infrastructure?

… and finally, most importantly, the most important question of them all: how can your enterprise extricate itself from requiring this behemoth of bad engineering?

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